The Joy Factor: Inspirational
Speech & Enriching Workshop
Jep Hostetler's signature keynote speech, leads audiences to discover
new joy and enthusiasm in their daily work, lives and relationships.

When you need a keynote speech that will both inspire your audience
and give them tools and insights that they can use to enhance their own
lives and those of the people around them, you need The Joy Factor.

The Joy Factor is a keynote speech filled wih laughter, fun, and a fresh
view of how to find and increase the joy in daily life. As the following
synopsis discusess, joy has a lot to do with choice.

The Joy Factor can be delivered as an inspirational speech, such as a
keynote or after-dinner speech, or in a longer seminar format. To learn
more about how The Joy Factor may fit with the needs of your group, call
or email Jep Hostetler today.
An inspirational speech that really does
inspire people!

"Absolutely wonderful. Funny with a
message that really touched me."

"Awsome!"

"It will help me dealing with my patients
and their spiritual needs."

"Very funny. He kept my attention. I'm sure
he has had a great life."

"Excellent presentation. Very
motivational."

"Excellent. A very inspirational speech."

"What a joy he is."
THE JOY FACTOR, A Brief Synopsis of the Speech
It seems fairly obvious that if we strive for happiness,
depending  on circumstances and situations outside of
ourselves, to provide  it, we will more than likely become
disappointed. Good health, solid relationships, a decent
job, children that behave, a place to live, all contribute
to well being. However, if we wait for all these
things to come together, something usually happens to change
the momentary happiness.

Joy on the other hand, is a choice. Joy has to do with how we look at life,
how we approach difficult and challenging situations, and our attitude
toward troubling times. It is my belief that we can maintain a semblance of
balance and a degree of serenity if we incorporate the "joy factor" into our
way of thinking. The "joy factor" is made up of six areas of life
understanding:
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"The Joy Factor" – Jep Hostetler

It seems fairly obvious that if we strive for happiness, depending on circumstances and situations outside of
ourselves, to provide it, we will more than likely become disappointed.  Good health, solid relationships, a decent
job, children that behave, a place to live, all contribute to well being.  However, if we wait for all these things to
come together, something usually happens to change the momentary happiness.

Joy on the other hand, is a choice.  Joy has to do with how we look at life, how we approach difficult and
challenging situations, and our attitude toward troubling times. It is my belief that we can maintain a semblance of
balance and a degree of serenity if we incorporate the "joy factor" into our way of thinking.  The "joy factor" is
made up of six areas of life understanding:

1.
Life is a gift.  The key here is to wake in the morning and celebrate the very existence of one's life.  For
many, those who have gone through extended illnesses or who have survived terrible hardships, the fact that they
are alive and relatively healthy is cause for celebration.  We did not earn our life, we did not purchase it, nor did
we create it.  We have it!  Celebrate the energy that comes with the mere existence of life itself.

2.
Life is sacred.  Persons of joy, those who understand the "joy factor" have the ability to see beyond outward
appearances.  In working with people who are afflicted with chemical dependency I have seen some very destitute
and "scroungy" looking people.  Where's the sacred?  To quote a television commercial, "It's in there".  People of
joy look for the "sacred" in all the persons they meet and greet.

3.
Life is difficult.  People of joy are quite aware of the presence of pain and the difficulties that accompany
life.  Those who smile all the time, in spite of the pain, in spite of the losses and grief, are simply not being
truthful.  Persons of joy acknowledge pain; acknowledge, "Today is pretty rotten".  What they do have is a sense
of toughness.  Siegel calls it "denial no, defiance yes".  It follows that people who understand the "joy factor" are
tough.  They go with the pain and strive for the gain. Courage is their middle name.

4.
Life is short. We have little time to waste in our relationships.  Every person we meet has significance and
can teach us something.  David Augsberger alludes to the three A's and the three R's.  People of joy are
accepting, keeping an open mind and reserving judgment when they meet new people. They are available to a
select number of friends to the extent that they can be depended upon for any kind of support at any time.  In
addition, people of joy are
authentic.  There is no facade and no fronting.  On the other hand, the "joy factor"
allows us to be present with other people and
recognize them.  We know their names, we see their small steps
and we
reinforce/reward their efforts.  Some call it encouragement.  Respect is the third thing that characterizes
people of joy.  They have respect for a wide variety of thinking and they understand the diversity in human
nature, beliefs and values.

5.
Life is funny.  The science of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) has to do with mind/body interactions.  Humor,
with its ensuing laughter, is just one of the expressions of the humor response.  Norman Cousins book, "The
Anatomy of an Illness" deals with the use of humor during recovery from extended illness.  Laughter, to be helpful,
must be inviting and forgiving, according to Christian Hegeseth, M.D. in his book "A Laughing Place".  People of
joy know how to laugh. They put sound to their smiles and delight in a hardy guffaw.  They look for funny things to
happen and relish the humor in every day life. The popularity and success of Bombeck and Cosby are clearly
related to their ability to connect every day life to a sense of humor that experiences life with reckless abandon.
(This section has magic, jokes, and audience participation…but is non-threatening).

6
. Life is a spiritual journey.  One cannot experience a somewhat complete sense of joy unless he or she has
taken the time to nurture the inner "quiet place".  Is it poetry that quiets your soul?  Music? Meditation? Prayer?  
The success of many treatment programs rests on the ability of persons with chronic illnesses to get in touch with
their spiritual nature, and find ways to nurture it.

Thus, the "joy factor" is really a way of looking at life through a realistic lens of appreciation, celebration,
tolerance, sensitivity and introspection.  Choosing to acknowledge what is and determining to change what can be
changed, people of joy have come to a balance and moments of serenity are theirs.